Posted by: preservehawaii | November 8, 2010

Meet the Honu of O’ahu’s North Shore

If you volunteer with Malama Na Honu on Oʻahu’s North Shore, you might get to know the green sea turtles below:

Brutus

Brutus was one of the first turtles to bask in the sun repeatedly at Laniakea Beach, Oʻahu. He’s been hooked by fishing line, entangled by nets, and nibbled on by predators, but he continues to lumber up on shore almost daily. He truly lives up to his Hawaiian name, Nalukai, “one who has weathered the storms of life.”

Olivia-Dawn

Olivia-Dawn, or Ipo (“sweetheart”) is a deep sea diver. During the first 20 days of her migration to the French Frigate Shoals, she averaged 16 dives per night—one of them 135 meters deep!

Kaheka

Kaheka (“tidepool”) is the youngest basker at Laniakea. After veterinarians de-hooked and disentangled him from fishing gear, they released him on Oʻahu’s windward side. In less than a week, he had swum back around the island, to the tidepools at Laniakea.

How can you tell these and the other 20-some honu at Laniakea apart? With the Honu ID book—there’s a copy in the volunteer beach bag to learn from. And every volunteer who logs in 100 hours gets their own personal copy.

To find out how you can join Malama Na Honu, visit their website: www.malamanahonu.org

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Posted by: preservehawaii | November 6, 2010

Support the Ahupua’a Initiative with Your Vote

There are lots of ways to support Hawaiʻi’s environmental organizations and agencies—by volunteering, through donation, even your vote … This month, the Ahupuaʻa Initiative, in collaboration with UH Manoa, is aiming for a $250,000 grant from Pepsi. A win will fund their pilot project to protect Hawaiʻi’s watersheds from pollution through a wireless monitoring network.

You can help them win by voting daily throughout November—they need to make it into the top 2 to get the grant!

Click here to vote.

And click here to learn more about the Ahupuaʻa Initiative.

Posted by: preservehawaii | November 1, 2010

Spotlight: Malama Na Honu

When you come to the North Shore, you might meet Brutus or Hiwahiwa or Olivia Dawn. They’re honu, Hawaiian green sea turtles, and one of them is usually basking on the sands at Laniakea Beach, Oʻahu.

The volunteers of Malama Na Honu have made it their mission to protect these threatened (meaning “likely to become endangered”) sea creatures, educating viewers on how to respect and protect them.

Stay tuned throughout November to learn how you can join Malama Na Honu, or visit their website: www.malamanahonu.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | October 27, 2010

Limu Festival Location Change to Hana Bay

This Saturday’s Limu Festival location has changed to Hana Bay (Kapueokahi) … Hope to see you there!

What: Hana Limu Festival
When: October 30, 10am-4pm
Where: Kapueokahi (Hana Bay)

For more information, contact Kipahulu ʻOhana, ohana@kipahulu.org, www.kipahulu.org, or festival coordinators Na Mamo O Muʻolea, www.muolea.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | October 25, 2010

Limu Festival in Hana

Limu (Hawaiian seaweed) is a nutritious part of a traditional Hawaiian diet, and is important to the health of the nearshore ecosystem, serving as food and shelter for small herbivorous fish. Hana’s 2nd annual Limu Festival will showcase educational activities for kids and adults, including limu planting, plus live music and food booths. Volunteers are needed Friday and Sunday to set up and clean up, and on Saturday with the festival itself. Come out to Hana, Maui, this weekend and learn about this important part of the Hawaiian culture …

What: Hana Limu Festival
When: October 30, 10am-4pm
Where: Haneoʻo (next to Koki Beach in Hamoa)

For more information, contact Kipahulu ʻOhana, ohana@kipahulu.org, www.kipahulu.org, or festival coordinators Na Mamo O Muʻolea, www.muolea.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | October 18, 2010

Turn Kalo into Poi

This month at Kapahu Living Farm, there’s plenty of kalo (taro) needing to be harvested and processed into poi for the Kipahulu community. Poi is a nutritious staple food of the Hawaiian people, and learning about it is one of the best ways to understand Hawaiian culture, talking story with local families while you work.

Volunteers will learn about harvesting kalo; cleaning, cooking, and preparing it; and grinding it into poi. And since it’s a full moon this weekend, there’ll likely be some kalo planting to do.

To find out how you can help, contact ohana@kipahulu.org, or for more information, visit the Kapahu Living Farm website at www.kipahulu.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | October 12, 2010

Saturday Fencing Project in Kipahulu

In the native forests above Kipahulu, Maui, feral animals are threatening to destroy the ecosystem … Join the Living Farm this Saturday, October 16, to help them finish installation of a feral animal control fence.

Fencing is strenuous work, and accessing the work site will take a good hike. But it’s a great way to learn about the farm’s ahupuaʻa/watershed management activities, meet other dedicated volunteers from the community, and help protect the forest and the source of fresh water for Kipahulu.

For more information, contact ohana@kipahulu.org or visit the Kapahu Living Farm website at www.kipahulu.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | October 4, 2010

Spotlight: Kapahu Living Farm

In Maui’s fertile Kipahulu Valley, on the island’s jungled east side, the ancient Hawaiian practice of taro cultivation is thriving at Kapahu Living Farm.

Planting taro in the lo'i at Kapahu Living Farm

Volunteering with the Living Farm means rolling up your sleeves (and your pant legs) and getting into the mud of the loʻi (taro patch), where you’ll work beside farmers whose families have lived here for generations. The farm prefers groups for volunteer projects, and accepts individuals (minimum 2 people) for their interpretive hikes, which take you from the Kipahulu area of Haleakala National Park up through the Living Farm for education in this ancient Hawaiian tradition.

Check back here throughout October to learn about you can get involved, or visit the Kapahu Living Farm website at www.kipahulu.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | September 27, 2010

Wildlife Volunteering in Kona

Volunteering with Three Ring Ranch Exotic Animal Sanctuary takes many forms (and they’re all free!):

– Groups are invited to join in on day projects
– Kona-area residents can become “animal keepers” with a 2-month commitment
– Pre-vet and vet students are always welcome for internships

To maintain their standing as a sanctuary designed to protect the well-being of their animal residents, the ranch isn’t open to the public on a regular basis—but educational tours can be scheduled for intimate groups. A suggested donation goes directly toward the animals’ upkeep. Contact the ranch for details:

Phone: (808) 331-8778
Email: animals@threeringranch.org

Three Ring Ranch is a nonprofit, fully accredited, entirely volunteer-run wildlife sanctuary dedicated to animal care and education. Visit their website to learn more about their programs: www.threeringranch.org

Posted by: preservehawaii | September 20, 2010

Exotic Animal Amnesty Center

Dogs and cats have been bred to be good companions. Living with a zebra isn’t quite so easy, nor a cheetah—once it grows past that cute, cuddly kitten stage … The exotic animal trade is rampant, even here in Hawaiʻi. And when pets become too large, or too unmanageable, their owners are often desperate to give them away.

If you know of an exotic animal living illegally in the islands, Three Ring Ranch in Kona (Big Island) is a no-questions-asked amnesty center—you can drop off the animal anonymously, and the ranch will find it a good home, or adopt it into their animal enrichment program.

Phone: (808) 331-8778
Email: animals@threeringranch.org

Three Ring Ranch is a nonprofit, fully accredited, entirely volunteer-run wildlife sanctuary dedicated to animal care and education. Visit their website to learn more about their programs, and how you can get involved: www.threeringranch.org

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